If you’ve driven between Florence and Yachats, you’ve passed the sign for Muriel O. Ponsler Memorial Wayside at the north end of coastal Lane County. When adding this beach to 100 Steps, I asked the natural question: Who was Muriel O. Ponsler?

According to a plaque on site, the park is named for a loved one of Jack C. Ponsler, who donated the land to the State Parks in dedication to his wife Muriel after her death. That’s certainly interesting…but I wanted to peek into their lives.

Dedication plaque at the park
Dedication plaque at the park

When I did some searching, I found no comprehensive overview of the couple or the park. What I discovered initially were dry vital statistics: birth, marriage, and death records, census records, motor vehicle registrations. This told me a bit about them, but it was not enough.

It was through newspaper references that Muriel and Jack shifted from a set of facts into three-dimensional personalities. Newspapers were the social media of the times. Much like today’s online social networking sites, they recorded “happenings” in people’s lives, although in text only. Highlights of party and club gatherings were described including decorations and attendee lists. Town visitor arrivals and departures were noted, resident’s out-of-town trips were shared, and significant purchases were outlined. The headlines, advertisements, significant events, and even the comics in these papers gave me a “feel” of the era some 100 years ago.

Since all of this data on the Ponslers is scattered across the web (and some on microfilm), I thought I’d share my findings in a consolidated article. Over a period of several weeks I’ve been transported back to an older Oregon, shared through the lives of Muriel and Jack Ponsler. I cannot convey all of that with a few paragraphs and photos, but if I do so in some small degree then I’ll consider this effort a success.

I, Muriel O. Grant

On September 21, 1897 Muriel Olivia Grant was born to Glenn and Alice Grant. She grew up in Dallas, Oregon with one sibling, Haldon, a brother eight years younger.[i]

As a youth Muriel was accomplished in piano, enjoyed play acting, and attended many parties and banquets where she sometimes performed instrumental solos. While attending Dallas High School she participated in a number of clubs including the Camp Fire Girls, Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), and the Philogian Literary Society.[ii]

Her Junior yearbook describes the Camp Fire Girls outings in 1914:

“The camp here has been on one trip of three days and a number of all day trips. On the camping trip, which was in the mountains, the girls arose one morning and beheld a large deer in the stream by which they were camped. Girl-like, the ones who discovered it, in no quiet voice announced its presence and, consequently, the deer decided it would be best for it to leave.”

She graduated from Dallas High School in June 1915, part of what was considered a “large” graduating class of 30, more than double the prior year’s graduate count. The “commencement exercise” involved a week-long list of music, speeches, receptions, and banquets.[iii]

Muriel’s social activities continued after high school, with her both attending and hostessing many parties. Holiday celebrations such as Valentine’s Day, Christmas, and New Year’s were a must. Guests entered a space specially decorated for the occasion. Party antics included dining, dancing, vocal and instrumental performances, cards (Five Hundred was popular), and even – particularly when Muriel was hostess – theater.[iv]

One such occasion involved entertaining Lamar Tooze, student representative from the University of Oregon on the Henry Ford Peace Mission prior to the United States entry into World War I.[v] Although the peace effort was ultimately ridiculed, Mr. Tooze was considered a person of some renown in Oregon at the time. The dinner was held March 31, 1916, after he had returned from the expedition. The event made the front page of The Sunday Oregonian, a newspaper out of Portland, with this headline:

1916 Sunday Oregonian Campfire Girls Headline

The headline was followed by a photo – rare in the papers compared to modern times – of the hostesses decked out in their ceremonial Indian costumes. As the caption notes, Muriel is the first girl in the middle row.[vi]

1916 Sunday Oregonian Campfire Girls Photo

Of the banquet, the article describes:

“An enjoyable four-course dinner was served, with Miss Muriel Grant presiding. Following the dinner Mr. Tooze related his experiences in securing his passports to accompany the Ford expedition.” [vii]

That passport story, by the way, is why Mr. Tooze was aboard the second peace ship, Frederick VIII, rather than the more famous Oscar II.[viii]

Although clearly in the heart of the social scene, touted as “one of the most popular members of the younger set in Dallas”, Muriel was more than a socialite. By 1917, at the age of 20, she worked at The Polk County Observer as city editor. When the paper’s manager left for “United States service,” presumably for duties related to World War I, Muriel acted as interim manager. [ix]

She left both Dallas and The Observer to become the “advertising solicitor” for The Salem Statesman in January of 1918, moving east to the state capital with a population over six times larger than her home town. The paper later expanded her role to include society editor, an obvious fit since she was well anchored in the social limelight herself. She remained at The Salem Statesman for a year and a half, and then returned to Dallas and her old job.[x]

Take Thee, Jack C. Ponsler

Chester William Ponsler was born on October 30, 1884, in El Dorado Springs, Missouri, the son of Jacob and Lizeabeth. At the beginning of the new century, the Ponsler family moved west, landing in San Bernardino. His dad being a carpenter, it was natural for Chester to follow in his footsteps, and in 1906 he was working as a shingler.[xi]

By 1909, Chester left California, heading north to McMinnville, Oregon. At around the same timeframe, he decided he preferred being called Jack, so records refer to him as Jack C. Ponsler or J. C. Ponsler from this time forward.[xii]

Front side of Jack’s World War I draft card, Sept 12, 1918
Front side of Jack’s World War I draft card, Sept 12, 1918

Jack’s first marriage was to Eden Marion Briedwell on November 10, 1909. Eden was born on October 22, 1889 to Edgar and Elnora Briedwell. She graduated from McMinnville High School in in 1907. Eden had lived in Oregon her entire life when she met Jack.[xiii]

Jack continued to work in home construction as a shingler in the early years of their marriage, and the couple remained in McMinnville. By 1918 Jack had become a tractor expert. This corresponds with the time Ford started selling tractors in the U.S. under the brand name Fordson. Jack’s handiness let him move into servicing this farm equipment, and his affability allowed him to branch into sales.   Eden had no trade or profession .[xiv]

The exact date of their divorce is unclear, but they were married nine or ten years. Jack listed Eden as his wife on his World War I Draft Registration card dated September 1918, yet the January 1920 McMinnville census shows Eden M. Ponsler living with her parents, with a marital status of Divorced. The divorce must have occurred between these two events, most likely prior to November of 1919 when Jack became district sales manager for Shattuck Motor Company, moving south 24 miles to Dallas to pursue auto sales.[xv]

To Have and to Hold

It is unclear how Muriel met Jack. Given that she handled advertising for the Salem newspaper, perhaps they encountered one another while Jack placed an ad supporting his sales efforts. Or maybe they attended a party held by a mutual acquaintance. Perhaps he saw her in a play and approached her to personally applaud her performance. It may be he was charmed by a tune she turned on the piano.

Whatever the means, they met. Muriel’s youthful exuberance, social connections, and entertainment talents well complemented Jack’s burgeoning auto sales career. What followed was somewhat of a whirlwind romance, and on July 5, 1920, Muriel O. Grant married Jack C. Ponsler in Vancouver, Washington.[xvi]

How did this event come about? And how did Washington enter the picture? This clipping from her prior employer recounts how it happened:[xvii]

Ponsler Marriage Recount

The newlyweds remained in Dallas after their marriage. Both continued their previous work.[xviii]

To Love and to Cherish

On May 17, 1921, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Ponsler left Dallas heading 140 miles south to Roseburg. Jack had lined up a sales manager job covering a large region with C.A. Lockwood Motor Company. According to a Salem-based newspaper, “He has always been a Ford salesman and a very successful one.” His prior repair experience must have been a bonus, since Lockwood Motor Co had a tractor service department.[xix]

Jack was in the right industry at the right time:

“Mass production made technology affordable to the middle class. The automobile, movie, radio, and chemical industries skyrocketed during the 1920s. Of chief importance was the automobile industry. Before the war, cars were a luxury. In the 1920s, mass-produced vehicles became common throughout the U.S. and Canada.” Wikipedia

By 1924 the Ponslers owned their own vehicle, first a coupe followed the next year by a sedan. Both Fords, of course.[xx]

Ponsler bridge luncheon
A typical recount of a social gathering

Muriel was the epitome of a small-town modern ‘20s woman. Frequently in the society pages, she enlivened her social standing in a new city by regaling guests with parties and bridge. She was a member of several clubs and was elected president of the newly formed Roseburg women’s club. On agenda were discussions of women’s matters, charitable activities, card play, and musical programs. Luncheons or refreshments were always served, with flowers and seasonal decorations adorning the hostess’ home.[xxi]

From this Day Forward

Jack’s ambition to be his own boss instigated another move, this time to the relatively undeveloped coastal community of Florence. On September 13, 1927, the Ponslers left Roseburg to open J. C. Ponsler Motor Company. This Ford agency and service center assigned to western Lane County had territory boundaries of Reedsport, Triangle Lake, and Roosevelt Beach. Muriel supported the new family business working as bookkeeper and “right hand helper in the office.”[xxii]

The Eugene Guard paints a picture of the coastal region at the time:

“When Jack Ponsler and his wife, Muriel, moved to Florence […], the Western Lane country was still in the primitive. The Siuslaw highway was not completed. From Mapleton to Florence the path was along the cliffs of the perilous old “River road” or over the tortuous switchbacks of the North Fork route and the Mapleton hill. Along the coast from Gardiner all the way to Newport, it was a maze of treacherous sand tracks, beach runs or spectacular “goat climbs” over such promontories as Cape Perpetua or Heceta Head.” [xxiii]

Where others may have been deterred, the Ponslers saw opportunity. Over the next couple of years, they focused on growing the business, selling Fords and servicing both Fords and farm equipment. The local newspaper sported a different J. C. Ponsler Motor Company ad each week. Given Muriel’s background in advertising from her time in Salem, the ads were probably her handiwork.[xxiv]

Within months of their arrival in Florence they expanded the garage. Jack joined the Chamber of Commerce and was soon elected secretary, an office he held for several years. Business was good, allowing them to purchase investment property, rental homes and buildings, as well as luxury items for themselves, including a 1928 Model A Fordor sedan.[xxv]

1928 Ford Fordor Sedan
1928 Ford Fordor Sedan – the type of car owned by the Ponslers in 1928

For Better, For Worse

As with their prior places of residence, Muriel and Jack were active in the community of Florence. It does not take long to get to know your neighbors when there are only a few hundred, and the couple was not shy. Muriel frequently held and attended parties, with Jack co-hosting on occasion. She participated in club events, serving food and playing piano accompaniment to others’ vocals for the enjoyment of the group.[xxvi]

Muriel Garden clipping
Accolades for Muriel’s flowers

The couple initially rented a home in town on Washington Street (renamed to Laurel in 1955) for a monthly fee of $20, which was considerably higher than the $5 norm. Success with their business ventures allowed them to own their own home by 1935, valued at $1500. Muriel gardened; Jack fished and hunted. Both travelled together or independently, depending on the trip’s purpose or destination. Family visits and business trips alike were combined with outings to view coastal sights and development progress – a new tunnel, the lighthouse, a fresh section of road, the sea lion cave, and of course miles and miles of lovely sea. [xxvii]

Muriel exercised her journalism skills on occasion, acting as “Register Florence Correspondent” for the Eugene-based Morning Register.   She authored a long piece on road issues and state highway commission discussions, which covered “Willamette Valley to Florence route” planning. A key take-away from the meeting was “people of Florence favor the route which leads down the Siuslaw river, rather than that over the North Fork hill.”[xxviii]

The Ponslers wanted to share “the ocean ozone and Florence scenery” with family and friends, tourists and guests. Muriel was known for her warm reception of out-of-towners, commonly offering a feast of coastal delicacies. Their hospitality and support for travel to Western Lane extended to offering a pet restroom for the dogs and cats accompanying their human visitors, an early day doggie day care.[xxix]

The Eugene Guard notes the Ponslers impact on the community of Florence:

The Ponslers had certain qualities of enthusiasm which soon made them as well known as the pioneers of the country. In their hospitable home, many a next step in the ambitious road program was planned. To their home or to their place of business came a long procession of visitors official and unofficial from “outside.” Devoted to fishing and hunting the Ponslers were authorities on “where to go” and “what to do.” In a few short years their personalities were marked on Western Lane. [xxx]

For Richer, For Poorer

Support for road development, as well as promoting coastal tourism, was a natural extension of Jack’s profession. The local paper remarked Jack was “pepped up over good roads more than anybody.”[xxxi]

Recollection of Jack’s road planning and Muriel’s hospitality
Recollection of Jack’s road planning and Muriel’s hospitality

A key milestone for both of these goals was the building and opening of the Siuslaw River Bridge. One of five final spans completing the Oregon Coast Highway, it was open for travel in 1936.

“The state highway department ordered the ferryboat service between Florence and Glenada to stop at noon on March 31, and simultaneously the barriers on the bridge were opened. More than a hundred cars were in line to be the first to cross the new structure.”[xxxii]

During this event, Jack took a photo from a construction-related tower on the south side of the bridge depicting the new river crossing packed with cars going both directions. This photo ended up in many Oregon newspapers reporting on the event. Although hosting responsibilities prevented them from being in the initial group who traversed the span, it seems certain that Jack and Muriel in their latest model Ford were amongst those who crossed on that momentous day.[xxxiii]

The official bridge dedication was held two months later on May 25. Jack was a significant contributor to the celebratory planning, including collaborating with officials in Salem prior to the event. Earl Hill, who served on the Chamber of Commerce with Jack, led the proceedings on dedication day. Jack acted as reception committee chairman. Noted by the Salem-based paper which previously employed Muriel, “The ceremonies were followed by an outdoor seafood dinner served by the women of Florence.” There is no doubt Muriel was in the thick on those preparations and did a fabulous job co-hostessing the event.[xxxiv]

Coinciding with the bridge opening, in anticipation of both tourist and local growth for the area, the Ponslers had a new building constructed to house J. C. Ponsler Motor Company, with space for service, sales, and offices. Located on new coast highway and Adams Street (renamed to Laurel in 1955), when complete it was touted as “one of the five best [buildings] on the whole Coast highway.” This was yet another well-timed move. Although the Florence population grew by only 12 between 1920 and 1930, the 1930 count of 329 people blossomed to 458 by 1940, more than a 25% increase.[xxxv]

In Sickness and In Health

In August 1938, Muriel was hospitalized for 10 days after an operation. Her specific ailment was not elaborated, but it was serious enough that when she returned to Florence she could no longer perform her office duties supporting the garage business. At the end of January 1939 the Ponslers sold J. C. Ponsler Motor Company, citing plans to “spend several months travelling for the benefit of Mrs. Ponsler’s health.”[xxxvi]

That travel included a trip to the Golden Gate International Exposition which opened February 18.[xxxvii]  It’s pleasing to picture them strolling together around Treasure Island during the opening weeks at San Francisco’s last World’s Fair. They would have viewed the architectural grandeur of the likes of the Tower of the Sun, Court of the Moon, Arch of Triumph, and Elephant Towers. Due to Muriel’s love of flowers, the Flower Court was a likely destination, perhaps passing fountains en route in the Court of Pacifica or at the feet of the Star Lady. They would have watched parades, been entertained by regional dancing, and passed through country-themed exhibits like those for Argentina or Japan.

Here’s actual footage of the 1939 San Francisco World’s Fair:

It’s unknown how long they delighted in the wonders of the World’s Fair, but by mid-March they had returned to Oregon, in transit to Dallas to visit Muriel’s family.[xxxviii]

Till Death do us Part

Muriel and Jack’s final time together was brief. Only two months after selling the garage, and a mere two weeks after returning from California, Muriel took her last breath in Florence, Oregon. At her death on March 29, 1939, she was 41 years of age. Her final resting place is at the Mount Crest Abbey Mausoleum in Salem, Oregon.[xxxix]

Oregon State Park entrance sign

In remembrance of their 19 years together, in April of 1939 Jack donated a lovely beach-side recreation area to the people of Oregon, via the State Park system. It is uncertain when Jack acquired this two acres of property located at the north most edge of his Ford territory, but given his other real estate purchases in Florence, his connection with the community, and his shepherding of the roads, it is not surprising that he came to own this land. Muriel O. Ponsler Memorial Wayside, later renamed to Muriel O. Ponsler Memorial State Scenic Viewpoint, remains today as a reminder of this woman and this couple.

A tribute to Muriel in The Eugene Guard recalls:

“Mrs. Ponsler will long be remembered as a woman of kind and generous impulses. Many a tired traveller was fed and refreshed in the bright cottage which was the Ponsler home. The visitor usually carried away an armload of the exceptional dahlias or sweet peas which were her delight to grow. […] Already people of the modernized Oregon Coast look backward to the “good days.” Warm hearted Muriel Ponsler was of those times. [xl]

Jack outlived Muriel by nearly 30 years. Throughout the 1940s and into the 1950s, he continued to actively lead and participate in the community affairs of Florence, including additional terms in office on both the Chamber of Commerce and the City Council. He never ceased to advocate for roads, and added both the Florence airport and harbor improvements to his list of causes. Jack passed away on October 7 of 1968 at the age of 83 following surgery at a hospital in Eugene. He was interred with Muriel in Salem, Oregon.[xli]

Final resting place of Muriel and Jack, Courtesy of EGF
Final resting place of Muriel and Jack, Courtesy of EGF

While living, Muriel Ponsler was popular with her friends and a proponent of the blooming community of Florence. Commonly mentioned in the newspapers, her home was a source of welcome and good times. Her hospitality and enthusiasm for the coast left a positive impression on those she encountered. Clearly devoted to her, her husband left her a legacy in the form of a state park bearing her name. Due to this, “Muriel O. Ponsler” continues to be associated with a venue that provides joy and entertainment to those who visit. Based on what I’ve learned of Muriel, I think she would have liked that.

Photo Gallery

References

The information in this article is derived from Census records, state indexes (birth, marriage and death), motor vehicle registrations, and many issues of various historical Oregon newspapers. Except in cases where I’ve indicated in the text that I’m speculating – “perhaps”, “maybe”, “it seems”, “probably”, “likely”, etc. – the rest are facts based on these sources. When sources conflicted, I’ve chosen the option that is most consistently used or most likely based on source reliability or other surrounding facts.  (Note: The reference links above work only when the references below are visible.)

Show References

[i] Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Dallas, Polk, Oregon; Roll: 1351; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 0173; FHL microfilm: 1241351; Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Dallas, Polk, Oregon; Roll: T625_1497; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 381; Image: 558.

[ii] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Will Graduate Thursday”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, June 13, 1911, Image 3 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1911-06-13/ed-1/seq-3/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Seniors Give Program”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, June 11, 1915, Image 1 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1915-06-11/ed-1/seq-1/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Doll Shop wins High Approval”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, October 31, 1913, Image 1 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1913-10-31/ed-1/seq-1/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Ancestry.com. U.S. School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. School Location: Dallas, Oregon, USA, 1914.

[iii] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “1915 Class is Large”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, May 28, 1915, Image 1 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1915-05-28/ed-1/seq-1/ : accessed 31 May 2015)

[iv] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “A Valentine Party”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, February 17, 1914, Image 1 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1914-02-17/ed-1/seq-1/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Play Five Hundred”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, November 09, 1915, Image 5 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1915-11-09/ed-1/seq-5/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Dancing Party”, “Theatre Party”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, January 04, 1916, Image 6 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1916-01-04/ed-1/seq-6/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Theatre Party Held”, Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, January 05, 1917, Image 2 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1917-01-05/ed-1/seq-2/ : accessed 1 June 2015)

[v] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Lamar Tooze Writes of Trip on Peace Ship Frederick VIII” Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, January 10, 1916, Image 5 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn99063957/1916-01-10/ed-1/seq-5/ : accessed 3 June 2015)

[vi] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Campfire Girls’ Bal Masque is Dallas’ most Successful Affair” The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, April 02, 1916, SECTION FIVE, Image 61.

[vii] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Campfire Girls’ Bal Masque is Dallas’ most Successful Affair” The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, April 02, 1916, SECTION FIVE, Image 61 (http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1916-04-02/ed-1/seq-61/ : accessed 1 June 2015)

[viii] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Lamar Tooze Was One of Twenty To Go With Ford Peace Party”, Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, December 17, 1915, Image 4. (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn99063957/1915-12-17/ed-1/seq-4/ : accessed 3 June 2015)

[ix] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Dallas Loses Girl City Editor”, Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) 1861-1937, January 25, 1918, Image 15 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1918-01-25/ed-1/seq-15/ : accessed 1 June 2015).

[x] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Weddings. Ponsler-Grant”, The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, July 11, 1920, SECTION THREE, Image 45. (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1920-07-11/ed-1/seq-45/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Muriel Grant and Jack Pousler are Married Sunday”, Capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1919-1980, July 07, 1920, Image 5. (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn90066132/1920-07-07/ed-1/seq-5/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Mr. and Mrs. Ponsler leave Dallas for Roseburg”, Capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1919-1980, May 19, 1921, Image 3 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn90066132/1921-05-19/ed-1/seq-3/ : accessed 1 June 2015).

[xi] Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. The National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; State Headquarters: Oregon; Record Group Name: Records of the Selective Service System; Record Group Number: 147; Archive Number: 563991; Box Number: 101; Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Year: 1900; Census Place: Eldorado Springs, Cedar, Missouri; Roll: 847; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0048; FHL microfilm: 1240847; Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. San Bernardino, California, City Directory, 1904 and 1906.

[xii] “Oregon, County Marriages, 1851-1975,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXK5-5YZ : accessed 31 May 2015), J C Pousler and Eden Briedwell, 1909; citing Yamhill, Oregon, United States, county courthouses, Oregon; FHL microfilm 4,474,642.

[xiii] “Oregon, County Marriages, 1851-1975,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXK5-5YZ : accessed 31 May 2015), J C Pousler and Eden Briedwell, 1909; citing Yamhill, Oregon, United States, county courthouses, Oregon; FHL microfilm 4,474,642; “Oregon, Births and Christenings, 1868-1929,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ5J-RMZ : accessed 31 May 2015), Edene Marian Briedwell, 22 Oct 1889; citing Amity, Yamhill, Oregon, reference it 1; FHL microfilm 2,229,591; Historic Oregon Newspapers. “M’Minnville High School Graduates” The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, June 15, 1907, Image 7 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn85042444/1907-06-15/ed-1/seq-7/ : accessed 2 June 2015).

[xiv] Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Year: 1910; Census Place: Medford Ward 2, Jackson, Oregon; Roll: T624_1281; Page: 17A; Enumeration District: 0114; FHL microfilm: 1375294; Historic Oregon Newspapers. Polk County observer. (Monmouth, Polk County, Or.) 1888-1927, November 29, 1910, Image 4 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088088/1910-11-29/ed-1/seq-4/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Historic Oregon Newspapers. The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, December 21, 1913, SECTION FOUR, Image 54 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1913-12-21/ed-1/seq-54/ : accessed 2 June 2015) ; Historic Oregon Newspapers. The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, January 07, 1917, SECTION FIVE, Image 67 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1917-01-07/ed-1/seq-67/ : accessed 2 June 2015); Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Mcminnville, Yamhill, Oregon; Roll: T625_1506; Page: 15B; Enumeration District: 452; Image: 317; Ancestry.com. U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. Registration State: Oregon; Registration County: Yamhill; Roll: 1852211; Our Business Men”, The Siuslaw Oar, 8 June 1928, Fri, Page 4.

[xv] Ancestry.com. U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. Registration State: Oregon; Registration County: Yamhill; Roll: 1852211; Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Year: 1920; Census Place: Mcminnville, Yamhill, Oregon; Roll: T625_1506; Page: 15B; Enumeration District: 452; Image: 317; Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Weddings. Ponsler-Grant” The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) 1881-current, July 11, 1920, SECTION THREE, Image 45. (http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1920-07-11/ed-1/seq-45/ : accessed 1 June 2015) ; Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Muriel Grant and Jack Pousler are Married Sunday” Capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1919-1980, July 07, 1920, Image 5. (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn90066132/1920-07-07/ed-1/seq-5/ : accessed 1 June 2015).

[xvi] Ancestry.com. Washington, Marriage Records, 1865-2004 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

[xvii] Newspapers.com. “Ponsler Marriage” The Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, Sun, Jul 11, 1920 – Page 3.

[xviii] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Muriel Grant and Jack Pousler are Married Sunday” Capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1919-1980, July 07, 1920, Image 5. (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn90066132/1920-07-07/ed-1/seq-5/ : accessed 1 June 2015)

[xix] Historic Oregon Newspapers. “Mr. and Mrs. Ponsler leave Dallas for Roseburg” Capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1919-1980, May 19, 1921, Image 3 (https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn90066132/1921-05-19/ed-1/seq-3/ : accessed 1 June 2015); Newspapers.com. “Florence Garage and Ford Agency sold to Ponsler”, The News-Review, 13 Sep 1927, Tue, Page 2; Newspapers.com. “To Myrtle Point”, The News-Review, 7 Dec 1923, Fri, Page 3.

[xx] Ancestry.com. Oregon, Motor Vehicle Registrations, 1911-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Oregon State Library; Salem, Oregon; State of Oregon: Automobile, Motorcycle, Dealer and Chauffeur Registrations, and Convictions for Violation of the Motor Vehicle Laws – July, 1924 (http://sharing.ancestry.com/6648224?h=202f2f : accessed 1 Jun 2015) and January, 1925 – Volume II (http://sharing.ancestry.com/6648188?h=38559c : accessed 1 Jun 2015).

[xxi] Ancestry.com. U.S., Women of the West, 1928 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com, 2011. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors; Newspapers.com. “Mrs. Ponsler Elected Woman’s Club President”, Daily Capital Journal, 24 Oct 1925, Sat, Page 5; Newspapers.com. “Provisions Wanted for Salvation Army”, The News-Review, 4 Mar 1925, Wed, Page 2; Newspapers.com. “Mrs. Ponsler and Mrs. Harris Hostesses”, The News-Review, 3 Nov 1923, Sat, Page 3; Newspapers.com. “Club Spends Afternoon with Mrs. Ponsler”, The News-Review, 20 Mar 1926, Sat, Page 6; Newspapers.com. “Visiting Here and There”, The Eugene Guard, 4 Sep 1938, Sun, Page 8.

[xxii] Newspapers.com. “Florence Garage and Ford Agency sold to Ponsler”, The News-Review, 13 Sep 1927, Tue, Page 2; Newspapers.com. “Spend the Labor Day Week-End In Western Lane’s Wonderland”, The Eugene Guard, 31 Aug 1929, Sat, Page 2; Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Florence, Lane, Oregon; Roll: T626_2667; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 20-59.; “Our Business Men”, The Siuslaw Oar, 8 June 1928, Fri, Page 4.

[xxiii] Newspapers.com. “Muriel Grant Ponsler” The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Thu, Mar 30, 1939 – Page 6.

[xxiv] “Farm Implements”, The Siuslaw Oar, 8 Mar 1929, Fri, Page 3.

[xxv] “Our Business Men”, The Siuslaw Oar, 8 June 1928, Fri, Page 4; Newspapers.com. “Has Faith in Siuslaw”, Morning Register, 13 Jul 1928, Fri, Page 5; Newspapers.com. “Florence Lot Leased”, The News-Review, 23 Feb 1929, Sat, Page 7; Newspapers.com. “Florence News Notes”, Morning Register, 13 Jul 1928, Fri, Page 5; ; “Earl Hill and J. C. Ponsler Are Re-elected to Siuslaw Chamber of Commerce”, Eugene Register-Guard – Mar 31, 1931, Page 10. (https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=KO00AAAAIBAJ&sjid=hOgDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6749%2C6412231 : accessed 13 June 2015); “Officers of Siuslaw Chamber!”, Unidentified newpaper, courtesy of Siuslaw Pioneer Museum, circa 1930.

[xxvi] “Ponslers Entertain for Bridge Club”, The Siuslaw Oar, 4 Jan 1929, Fri, Page 2; “Siuslaw Gun Club Host to Eugene”, Eugene Register-Guard – Aug 20, 1928, Page 5, (https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1310&dat=19280820&id=DSNZAAAAIBAJ&sjid=XekDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6573,6045915&hl=en : accessed 20 June 2015).

[xxvii] Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Year: 1930; Census Place: Florence, Lane, Oregon; Roll: T626_2667; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 20-59; Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Year: 1940; Census Place: Florence, Lane, Oregon; Roll: T627_3369; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 20-59; Newspapers.com. Newspapers.com. “Visiting Here and There”, The Eugene Guard, 4 Sep 1938, Sun, Page 8; “From North Beach”, The Eugene Guard, 29 Sep 1938, Thu, Page 2; Newspapers.com. “Horton Man Leads in Siuslaw Salmon Race”, Corvallis Gazette-Times, 25 Sep 1947, Thu, Page 9; “Officers of Siuslaw Chamber!”, Unidentified newspaper, courtesy of Siuslaw Pioneer Museum, circa 1930; “Our Business Men”, The Siuslaw Oar, 8 June 1928, Fri, Page 4; “Home News In Brief”, The Siuslaw Oar, 17 Aug 1928, Fri, Page 3; “Local Chamber in Real Pep Session”, The Siuslaw Oar, 26 June 1931, Fri, Page 1.

[xxviii] Newspapers.com. “Lane Leaders Talk Highway Problems”, Morning Register, 19 Aug 1928, Sun, Page 1.

[xxix] Newspapers.com. “Spend the Labor Day Week-End In Western Lane’s Wonderland”, The Eugene Guard, 31 Aug 1929, Sat, Page 2; Newspapers.com. “Touring Dogs Housed”, The Bend Bulletin, 24 Sep 1936, Thu, Page 6.

[xxx] Newspapers.com. “Muriel Grant Ponsler” The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Thu, Mar 30, 1939 – Page 6.

[xxxi] “Our Business Men”, The Siuslaw Oar, 8 June 1928, Fri, Page 4; “Call it Either Sense or Sentiment for the Roads”, Eugene Register-Guard – Sep 17, 1952, Page 8A. (https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=PcoUAAAAIBAJ&sjid=xOIDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6305%2C3922066 : accessed 13 June 2015)

[xxxii] Newspapers.com. “Florence People Plan Dedication”, Medford Mail Tribune, 25 May 1936, Mon, Page 8.

[xxxiii] “Bridge Opened Tuesday Noon”, The Siuslaw Oar, 3 Apr 1936, Fri, Page 1.

[xxxiv] “Bridge Dedication Plans Progressing”, Eugene Register-Guard – Apr 1, 1936, Page 1. (https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=QLkRAAAAIBAJ&sjid=begDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5987%2C1065319 : accessed 17 June 2015); “Home News In Brief”, The Siuslaw Oar, 13 Mar 1936, Fri, Page 3; Newspapers.com. “Dedication Held At Siuslaw Span”, The Oregon Statesman, 26 May 1936, Tue, Page 1.

[xxxv] “J.C. Ponsler Starts Big Improvement”, The Siuslaw Oar, 28 Feb 1936, Fri, Page 1; “New Ponsler Garage Opens Doors Today”, 5 June 1936, Fri, Page 1; “Florence City has 329, and Growing”, The Siuslaw Oar, 30 May 1930, Fri, Page 1; Year: 1940; Census Place: Florence, Lane, Oregon.

[xxxvi] Newspapers.com. “Florence Items” The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Thu, Sep 1, 1938 – Page 8; Newspapers.com. “Ponsler Sells Big Florence Garage”, The Eugene Guard, 31 Jan 1939, Tue, Page 1; Newspapers.com. “Mrs. J.C. Ponsler Dies Wednesday”, The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Thu, Mar 30, 1939 – Page 14; Newspapers.com. “Ponslers Sell Garage”, The News-Review, 2 Feb 1939, Thu, Page 3; “Home News In Brief”, The Siuslaw Oar, 26 Aug 1938, Fri, Page 3; “Grim Reaper Calls Mrs. J. C. Ponsler”, The Siuslaw Oar, 31 March 1939, Fri, Page 1.

[xxxvii] Newspapers.com. “Florence Folk Here” The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Tue, Mar 14, 1939 – Page 4.

[xxxviii] Newspapers.com. “Florence Folk Here” The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Tue, Mar 14, 1939 – Page 4.

[xxxix] Ancestry.com. Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Oregon State Library; 1966-1970 Death Index; Reel Title: Oregon Death Index A-L; Year Range: 1931-1941.

[xl] Newspapers.com. “Muriel Grant Ponsler” The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Thu, Mar 30, 1939 – Page 6.

[xli] “Florence Airport Standardized”, Eugene Register-Guard – May 11, 1947, Page 3, (https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1310&dat=19470511&id=R-ZPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=EwgEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6885,2485806&hl=en : 20 accessed June 2015); “Light Craft Development for Siuslaw Harbor”, Eugene Register-Guard – Mar 24, 1953, Page 19, (https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1310&dat=19530324&id=UhZWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=veIDAAAAIBAJ&pg=2059,1395847&hl=en : accessed 20 June 2015); Ancestry.com. Oregon, Death Index, 1898-2008 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Oregon State Library; 1966-1970 Death Index; Reel Title: Oregon Death Index A-Z; Year Range: 1966-1970; “Florence Council”, Eugene Register-Guard – Jan 13, 1949, Page 8, (https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=irRWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=k-gDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5367%2C5030195); “Jack Ponsler Dies in Eugene”, The Siuslaw News, 10 Oct 1968.